18 Irish Words That The English Language Needs To Adopt Right Now

Because sometimes a translation just doesn't do it justice...

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Call us crazy, but we think you guys liked our last Irish piece.

So, we decided to treat you to a second instalment of 18 more words the Irish language has, that the English language needs. Doesn't matter if you love Irish, loathe Irish, or have never heard Irish - we certainly have a word or two, for you.

1. Áilleagán mná

(All-ig-on min-awh)

Literally: ‘a useless, pretty woman’, or bimbo.

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2. Banchealgaire

(Ban-cyal-gurra)

A seductive woman, a siren. Think Jessica Rabbit, with a paddy cap on.

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3. Maróg

(Mar-oge)

A pot-bellied person. Maróg is also the Irish word for pudding.

Lol.

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4. Alpaire

(Alpurra)

A person who eats too much. Possibly too much maróg.

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5. Súdóg

(Sue-dogue)

A woman who chats the arse off you.

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6. Leibide

(Leb-id-eh)

A foolish, pitiful person who can’t seem to catch a break.

‘'Ah don't bother him, he’s just a poor auld leibide'’

7. [ag] fearaíocht

([egg] far-eee-ukt)

The act of showing off like a prick.

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8. Gairbhín

(Gar-veen)

Unseasonal cold and windy weather in early May.

Wonder what that’s like…

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9. Glic

(Glick)

A derogative way to describe someone cunning or sly. A cute hoor, if you will.

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10. Patalóg

(Pat-a-logue)

A chubby child, and thus a term whose use amounts to child cruelty.

You monster.

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11. Fite fuaite

(fitcha fue-atcha)

Entangled. Fite (woven) and fuaite (sewn), the two ways of holding things together used when making a boat back in the day.

One of those phrases that makes you think that Irish isn’t too far off Chinese.

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12. Ciotóg

(cyut-oge)

A left-hander, deriving from the Irish word ‘ciotach’, meaning ‘awkward’.

Shit one, lefties.

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13. Faoiseamh

(fwee-shiv)

A release, reprieve or relief from pain.

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14. Mí na Meala

(mee na malla)

Literally: ‘a month of sweetness’, really ‘honeymoon’, but referring to new love. This, therefore, gives you licence as an Irish person to go on a month long romantic bender with your new significant other.

You're welcome.

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15. Slán

(slawn)

You know this one from school, but did you know how to properly use it?

Both ‘safe’, and ‘goodbye’ – because we Irish love telling people to be safe when they leave – if you pronounce it in a high-pitched elongated format, it can be used to deliver a snide 'good riddance'. Gives us the English ‘So long!’

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16. Rí-rá agus ruaille buaille

(ree-raw og-us rue-ill-ya bue-ill-ya)

Bedlam, divilment, good fun, or any sociable activity that improves with fine food, or a shot of whiskey.

''Some craic last night wasn't it?'' ''Rí rá and ruaille fuckin' buaille bud!''

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17. Sliabhín

(shleeve-een)

An untrustworthy or cunning person. A cousin of glic.

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18. Spraoi

(spree)

Playing, fun and all round good times. Gives us the English ‘spree’. Also fun to say hammered.

Written By

Kate Demolder

Kate is a contributing writer here at Lovin Dublin. You are as likely to see her indulging in some of Dublin’s finer establishments, as well as panic-exercising the day after.

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