PICS: You'll Never Guess What's Behind This Unassuming Blue Door In Dublin City Centre

22 South Anne Street has gotten itself a trendy new overhaul

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Stroll along South Anne Street on any given day and you'll find three things. Coffee shops, burger joints and acres of flowers. 

A beautiful street by all accounts, it's always caught our eye. But walk along those red-brick paved streets these days and you'll notice something slightly different as of late...

A big blue door. How enticing. 

22 South Anne Street, the former home to Irish music havens like McGonagles (where U2 played some of their first gigs) and The Crystal Ballroom (the namesake of one of their tunes) is now home to the ethereal Magistorium - the new place of worship for lovers of all kinds of music, good times and great food. 

Upon entering, you're transported into another world, made up of thick blue velvet curtains, meticulously carved wooden décor and stone walls that a Roman Catholic church would be proud of. 

Due for a media preview on Thursday 27 and a general public opening the following Thursday, the venue is still under construction, but as of what's inside presently - it's pretty bloody cool.

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Immediately inside you'll find the 'confessional box' or box office in layman's terms, leading you down a beautiful constructed and decorated hallway, which leads you downstairs (yes, underground) to the belly of the beast. 

The gorgeous staircase leads you down to undeniably beautiful stained glass windows, and on to the Scriptorium. This room is where you'll find all the newest and hippest bands in town performing, and let us tell you, that room has a cracking energy. 

All the bars, walls and furniture have either been refurnished, sourced from antique stores or restored to their former glory - but the new staging area is all brand new, and ready for the taking.

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The concept of dinner and a show has been totally lost on Dublin, until now. Only here can you sit at a beautifully furnished table and chairs, and watch (either from a height, or on stage level) a really incredible act do their thing.

Upon speaking to owners, investors and builders about the inspiration about the place, the response we got was: 

I mean, why not? London has it, Paris has it, New York has it and now Dublin has it.

As far as acts go, the venus is open Thursday - Sunday for the moment, with dedicated acts each night.

Thursdays - CEOL i.e. Traditional Irish music night. This will feature world-class acts like Martin Hayes and Frankie Gavin, and homegrown talents like MOXIE and Stockton Swing. 

Fridays1922 Dublin i.e. an immersive theatrical experience, highlighting what life would have been like way back when. The show will involve big screens, incredible acts and even surprise guest appearances.

Saturdays - 1922 New York i.e. a New York themed affair, influenced and based around smooth music and incredible dramatic performances. 

Sundays - Jazz Brunch i.e. Dublin's newest take on brunch, running from 12pm - 4pm, serving up all the delicious food you could imagine, with sensational acts like Honor Heffernan taking the reigns, serenading you like there's no tomorrow. 

Meals and menus are tailored to each evening, but they're all generally based on good Irish staples with modern twists. For an example of price, CEOL comes in at €30 for the gig alone and €65 with dinner included. 

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Looking for something different to hit up this winter?

Then look no further than Irish music's spiritual home, Magistorium, 22 South Anne Street. 

See you there.

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Written By

Kate Demolder

Kate is a contributing writer here at Lovin Dublin. You are as likely to see her indulging in some of Dublin’s finer establishments, as well as panic-exercising the day after.

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