Thursday Nights Are For Trips To The Cinema, Here's What To Go See Tonight

Choose popcorn over a pint!


With the weeks starting to get longer and the days shorter, those wretched post-Summer blues would appear to be settling in.

While September may have a fairly bad rap as a cinematic dumping ground, there’s still plenty to see down at your local cinema..


From Weds 9th September.

General Release.

Anyone remember 1990’s The Krays? Starring Spandau Ballet’s Martin and Gary Kemp as the titular gangster twins who ruled London in the ‘60s? Anyone? Never mind. This new take on the Kray twins is a hyper-violent comedic thriller, boasting the unique presence of two Tom Hardys in the dual role of brothers Ronnie and Reggie. Legend looks to be a rip-roaring testament to the madness of the brothers’ reign. They’ve even put the bad reviews on the poster - now, that’s confidence!


From Fri 11th September.

IFI Dublin.

Another biopic, but one that tackles an entirely different historical figure altogether. Starring Willem Dafoe as legendary Italian director, poet and all-round genius Pier Paolo Pasolini, Abel Ferrara’s film charts the final days in the man’s life, leading up to his mysterious, horrific murder. This one premiered at the Venice Film Festival just over a year ago to rave reviews, with particular praise heaped on Dafoe’s powerful performance. Edgy and provocative, Pasolini no doubt won’t be to all tastes. See for yourself, exclusively in the IFI this week.

Irrational Man

From Fri 11th September.

Limited Release.

If any director insists on making a film every single year, as Woody Allen has (almost) done over his 50 year career, inevitably, the hit-miss ratio is going to occasionally dip towards the latter. Recently, for every Oscar-winner like 2013’s Blue Jasmine, there is a quickly forgotten dud like last year’s Magic in the Moonlight. With Irrational Man, Allen reunites with the flawless Emma Stone, starring alongside Joaquin Phoenix, coming off a string of brilliant performances in the likes of Her and Inherent Vice. Following Phoenix’s existential college professor Abe as he plots a murder, Irrational Man doesn’t appear to deviate too far from Allen’s regular output, but should offer up some memorable performances from its two leads.

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