11 Irish Excuses For Running Late – And What They Really Mean

According to research (no, really), the phrase 'in a minute' means longer in Dublin that anywhere else in the country

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From “in a minute” to “I'm just in a taxi”, it's rare that you'll get a straight answer when you ask an Irish person for their estimated arrival time.

However, it seems that we're all about to become a lot more accountable, as a new survey – called the Big Survey Of Irish Time, and carried out by EBS – has revealed that truth about those white little lies we use when running late.

Damn it.

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1. The 'scientific' duration of 'in a minute' is actually four minutes and 59 seconds.

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2. Unless you're in Dublin, where people seem to be a bit lazier and take five minutes and 32 seconds

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3. You're not 'dead late' until you're 43 minutes and 39 seconds running behind.

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4. Unless you're in Dublin, when you have exactly 59 minutes

This has to stop

5. A 'donkey's year' is 14 years and five months. Who knew?

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6. Some 29% of Irish people say 'I'm in the taxi' when they haven't left the house

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7. The 'other week' is actually two weeks

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8. Nearly a third of Dubliners reckon that ' 'two shakes of lamb's tail' is the most annoying phrase in relation to time

You've been warned.

Phoebe stop the madness

9. Our favourite response as a nation is “I'll be there now, in a minute”

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10. If someone says 'let's meet up soon', it's never going to happen

Like, ever.

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11. And 35% of Dubliners reckon they're “always early”

LIARS.

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To find out when was the best time to meet for Irish home buyers, EBS surveyed just over 1,000 respondents from a nationally representative sample of the Irish population on the 15th August 2015.

Check out some of the survey responses

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